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WhatToWearPhatom

This weekend the wife and I are headed to Shea’s Performing Arts Center for the highly anticipated Phantom of the Opera show! While the show itself has always been a favorite of ours, just the act of attending a show at Shea’s remains one of our all time favorite things to do in Buffalo.

Originally opened in 1926, the beautifully ornate theater is modeled in a combination of Spanish, French Baroque and Rocco styles to resemble Opera houses from the 17th and 18th century. Also boasting one of the few theater organs in the U.S still in operation and incredible Tiffany chandeliers, Shea’s is the perfect venue for Phantom of the Opera. Naturally, while attending the theater, it is always a sign of good form to show up dressed in your best. That’s why I’ve opted for this classic tuxedo look with a slight Dandy flair. The slim, updated cut of the tux paired with this incredible scarf and hat combo from England-based bespoke tailor Joshua Kane completes an outfit that the Phantom himself would be jealous of.

Theory Tuxedo Jacket | Theory Marlo Tuxedo Pants | Theory Dover Tuxedo Shirt | Theory Foldin Bow Tie | PS by Paul Smith Derby Shoes | Joshua Kane Bespoke ‘Gostick’ Hat | Joshua Kane Bespoke ‘The Jordan’ Scarf | Omega Speedmaster ’57

PocketSquares

Part 2 in a series of blog posts by guest editor Mr. Ewy, in which he shares with us some of his favorite things.

When you look at pictures of your grandfather straight pimpin’ when he was younger, or when you watch Don Draper charm the ladies, or when you read old copies of Esquire, the one thing you can always be certain of is that if they were in a sport coat, they had a pocket square.  It is said that you can tell a well dressed gentleman by looking at his left half, because you can see the tie, shirt, sportcoat and pocket adornment all at once. Even without a tie, pocket squares complete your look and separate the novices from the true gentleman.  Men sometimes are afraid of pocket squares, but really, it is easy to wear one and to make one look effortless.

The easiest rule with pocket squares is that they should complement your tie or shirt and not match it exactly.  You don’t want to look like you bought a set at Men’s Warehouse and shame on you if you did.  If you want a crisp Don Draper look, go for a cotton pocket square.  They fold easier and will keep a crisper line.  Called the “presidential fold”, you just fold the square an appropriate number of times to fit into your pocket.  I like to show about 1/8” to 1/4” of square.

classic-sequence-numbered-664

For the more daring, go for a silk pocket square.  Forgot all of those overly showy folds:  the flower, the “three tips up” (easy there Gordon Gekko), double fold, etc.  Just do a casual fold, also known as a “puff fold”.  Set your square down, make an “OK” symbol with one hand, pull it through the circle with your other, fold it back on itself and voila, instant dandy.

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Accessories are where a man can have fun, and pocket squares are a great way to add some color, pattern or whimsy to your outfit.  I sometimes just buy fabric swatches that I like, fold ‘em and no one knows it isn’t a real pocket square.  Speaking of, look for squares that have hand rolled edges or finishings.  You can tell because the stitches will be pleasantly un-even, unlike if they were sewn using a machine.  You really don’t need to buy a super expensive square, but if you have one, it is fun to show the edge when you wear it so you can speak the secret language of the well-heeled.  Others in the game will spot it immediately.

PocketSquares2PocketSquares3

A WORD OF CAUTION:
I was in a panic to buy a white pocket square to wear at a black tie event (the struggle is real, people) and bought the one below out of desperation.  In addition to being polyester, you can see that it is a machine finished edge, and not a good one at that.

PocketSquares4
Ben Ewy is a gentleman of fortune and bon vivant living and working in Ann Arbor, MI. Follow more of his exploits on Instagram @bewewy

MacHeader

Yes, it is necessary to listen to the song while reading this post…

Well, the calendar assures us that it’s Spring in Buffalo, despite the 20 degree weather outside. That means it’s time to start thinking about a solid raincoat for the season for when the snow eventually turns to rain. The Mackintosh Jacket as it’s also know by, has been a gentleman’s wardrobe staple for decades and thanks to updates fabrics, bold colors and slimmer silhouettes, now is the perfect time to pick one up. Below are my top 5 favorite Mac Jackets for this season.

Mac1
ASOS $107.50
Mac2
Native Youth Mac Jacket $150
Mac3
Banana Republic Double Breasted Trench Coat $250
Mac4
Hugo Boss “Mion” Jacket $595
Mac5
Mackintosh Laggan Rain Coat $870

Canal Side, first Sunday of Spring, Noon, 22 March 2015

“Spring is in the air!” is perhaps more of a mantra than a reality. Yet time’s winged chariot is hurrying near. Let us roll all our strength and all our sweetness up into one ball, and tear our pleasures with rough strife through the iron gates of life:
Thus, though we cannot make our sun stand still, yet we will make him run!
It is with great audacity that we muster our very own Spirit of Buffalo home to it’s harbor for the 6th Annual run of Tweeds. Don your finery and gather with us Canalside for this heralded bicycle ride to Hoyt Lake for a chance to take home the cheese. Afterwards we plan to warm the Essex St. Pub for a toast. 
As always be responsible for your own well being and belongings. Please abide all safe riding recommendations

Invite all of your friends! Everyone is welcome. 

BurtonGoods

Speaking of goods that are built to last, Burton Snowboards just unveiled their Spring/Summer 15 line aptly entitled “Durable Goods“. Fully embracing their outdoor roots, the Vermont-based lifestyle brand clearly shows that it’s not just all about snowboards: it’s an attitude, a mindset and a culture. From their always on point graphics, to their awesome looking pants which ingeniously include a side pocket for your “pen” (pocket knife), their rugged looking waxed cotton canvas bags, one of the best looking iPad cases EVER, and finally coming as a huge surprise: camping gear. This is an interesting move by Burton but it completely makes sense giving their demographic’s penchant for the great outdoors. Below are some of my favorite items from the collection, which totally have me stoked for Spring. If the snow ever melts that is…

BurtonDurableGoods

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RedwingBoots
Part 1 in a series of blog posts by guest editor Mr. Ewy, in which he shares with us some of his favorite things.

To say I love the Red Wing family of boots is an understatement.  I bought my first pair in 1992 — which I still own, but more on that later — and have bought four more pairs since. They exemplify everything I like:  heritage, workmanship, performance, rugged style, Made in the USA, and quality so good that I plan on giving them to my sons one day.  First a little history…

In 1905, Red Wing, MN shoe salesman Charles Beckman and fourteen investors sought to make rugged boots that could stand up to the harsh conditions of mining, logging and farming, and they did just that. The Red Wing family has other members.  Irish Setter, born in 1950, were initially made for hunters.  Their first boots were made in Red Russet (my pair is in this color), inspired by the color of their namesake dog.  After visiting Europe and seeing the hiking craze, then CEO of Red Wing William D. Sweasy created the brand Vasque (I still have my Sundowners from college) to meet the needs of domestic hikers.  If you have owned boots from any of these lines you probably still wear them and cherish them as I do.

But what makes them so good?  First, the construction.  Most are made with Goodyear welting and if not, they have Gore Tex or other weatherproofing technology to keep you dry.  Second, the leather.  THEY OWN THEIR OWN TANNERY!!!  How many brands can say that?  Third, the performance.  These boots were made to stand up to working conditions form the 1900s, meaning they will certainly perform on your commute to work.  Lastly, the styling.  These are rugged by design.  There are no superfluous ornaments or details, every stitch is there for a reason and the different boot shapes reflect their end use.  For example, the “Roughneck” boot was made specifically for oil rig workers.

So, where do you start?  I say the Heritage Collection, made the same way they were 50, 60, or even 100 years ago.  These are the timeless classics and you can not go wrong with any of them.  That said, even though I love the brand, the J. Crew boots should be looked at with suspicion.  If you buy a pair, make sure the insoles are leather, and not EVA (like the pair I bought when they first came out) as they will not mold to your feet the same way and will hold on to odors.  Also, boots and fine dress shoes should ALWAYS have full cow leather linings and insoles.  As long as we are on the topic, we all know how to tell the difference between cow and pig leather (favored by most Chinese made shoes and boots), right?  On pig, you can see the tiny holes left by their hair follicles.  Cow leather is smooth.  Look inside your shoes, are they cow?

RedWingBoots2

So, my boots.  I have had two of them for more than half my life.  They have been around the world with me.  In fact, if I travel with them, I wear them on my feet as I couldn’t live with myself if they were lost with my luggage.  But the responsibility of owning beautiful things is that you have to take care of them.  With these boots, it is pretty easy.  Once a season, give them a good brushing, then a dousing in either the boot oil or conditioner and you now have a cherished heirloom that your sons will fight over when you go to the big shoe store in the sky.

Ben Ewy is a gentleman of fortune and bon vivant living and working in Ann Arbor, MI. Follow more of his exploits on Instagram @bewewy

BDGreenCap

BridgeBurnCaps

Portland-based Bridge & Burn recently partnered with OMFGCO to produce a series of workwear-inspired baseball caps. Available in 3 color ways (denim pinstripe, olive and black) the caps feature a felt patch in either the Bridge & Burn logo or OMFGCO’s logo. Made in the USA from 100% cotton, the caps come with an adjustable nylon strap in the back and a flexible flat brim which can be curved and shaped to your liking. While you’re at it, be sure to take a look at the rest of Bridge & Burn’s website for some stellar outdoorsy gear all of which is very affordably priced.

$48

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FebruaryVinylLibations

Another great month of Vinyl Libations here at Buffalo Dandy. Received some wonderful vinyl gifts for my birthday and our trip to Vermont with The Buffalo Whiskey Guild yielded some highly coveted brews.

 

Marvis Toothpaste

MarvisMintToothpaste

Recently I decided to upgrade some of my lavatory accoutrements and after reading about the cult following behind the official toothpaste of #menswear, I purchased a tube of Marvis Toothpaste.

Some readers may be hesitant to spend $10 on a single tube of toothpaste, but for those looking to exude style in every facet of their life, Marvis is a great way to start/end your day. Available in 5 mint flavors (Ginger, Whitening, Aquatic, Jasmin and Classic Strong) the apothecary-inspired designs and bold colors beg to be displayed in the bathroom. Too good to be simply tossed in a drawer, I even had a hard time throwing the box away because it looked so beautiful. Looks aside, the flavor of the toothpaste is very curious indeed. Something about it is both familiar and new at the same time. Boasting a much stronger mint flavor than your average toothpaste and fluoride levels which apparently border on dangerous, the mixture of taste and strong aromas definitely brings something new to the brushing experience.

Is all this enough to justify the price? That’s up to you. I do know that having my own toothpaste and not worrying about the wife squeezing the tube from the middle is reason enough for me to buy it.

$10.50

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