With the recent dip in temperature and the more flowing garments I acquire/make, today seemed like the perfect opportunity to finally try out this ASOS Blanket Scarf I purchased last year but never actually wore. Fall is the perfect time to start wearing something as daring as this because it provides just the right amount of warmth and looks freaking amazing blowing in the wind as you walk down the street striking a sweet #menswear pose.

Sadly this style is no longer available, but you can check out some of the latest versions on ASOS’s website here.


Timex has once again teamed up with J.Crew to offer a new take on the classic diver watch. Featuring a quartz analog movement with a functioning bezel, this military inspired black-on-black tactical diver watch comes with a great heavy duty brown nato strap (with other color options available). Very affordably priced at $128, this is a great no-fuss watch that will surely get better looking with age.

DIY Noragi


As I’m sure you’ve noticed from some of the recent outfit posts on the blog and BD Instagram,  these past few seasons I’ve been more and more obsessed with longer sweaters and jackets, particularly ones of the Japanese kimono variety. One of the most revered brands which specializes in this style of jacket is Visvim and their Sanjuro jackets. While these garments are beautiful to look at and undoubtedly exceptionally made, the price range for the majority of these coats is astronomical. Like $1,000 astronomical. Not gonna happen.

While I’ve been salivating over one of these for a while and playing with the idea of scouring sites like Grailed.com for a used one, I wasn’t even sure if I would like how it looked on me once I got it. Then I remembered, oh wait, I can totally just sew one of these myself for like $20. So that’s what I did. After doing some research on kimono and noragi jackets (which I found out was the correct term for what I was trying to make) I acquired the right kind of mid-weight denim I was looking for and got to work. Naturally this took a little longer than usual to make because my sewing time had to revolve around waiting the wife and I put the kids to bed, but once I got back into the swing of staying up late and flexing the old sewing muscles I realized just how much I had missed making my own clothes.

I chose to keep the edges of the eri (collar) raw, for both a contrast and distressed look and I kept the sleeves longer than the standard workwear shortened length so I could roll the sleeves if I wanted. While the final result is far from perfect, that was a great way to give this style of outerwear a test drive without breaking the bank. Plus the fact that I can say “yeah I made this” never gets old.

If you are digging this style of jacket and are curious of where to get one, I’ve picked out some of my favorite options below. Like I said, been obsessing over these for a while.

Visvim | Etsy | ASOS | Grailed | Betabrand


Had to share these stunning, recently colorized photos of one Buffalo’s great architectural tragedies, the Larkin Administration Building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. A wonder of modern engineering when it was designed in 1903, the Larkin Building was one of the first in the country to utilize innovations like air conditioning, stained glass windows, built-in desk furniture and suspended toilet bowels. Despite countrywide editorial protest to save The Larkin, the building was sadly demolished in 1950 after years of trying to be sold. More incredible photos from this collection can be seen here.


Old Navy Mac


Fall is finally here in Buffalo and while we’re chomping at the bit to start wearing tweed and chunky sweaters, the weather is not quite there yet, which is when having a lightweight jacket this time of year is clutch. If you remember our previous post last Spring about the Return of the Mackintosh Jacket, you’ve hopefully picked one up and should already be good to go. In the off chance that you haven’t, be thou not afraid, for I recently picked one up at Old Navy of all places. I feel like Old Navy gets a bad rap, even though we’ve mentioned them several times on this blog. They do a decent  job of creating good wardrobe essentials that are just the right amount of trendy at very affordable prices. The jacket was only $70, is cut nicely (I’m wearing a small) and has just the right amount of detailing in it to let you know some actual thought went into making it. It sold out rather quickly online last week when they were having a 40% off sale, but it looks like it’s back up here. You can also stop into the store at the Galleria and pick one up yourself.



Noted watch geek, devote Visvim collector and currently one of my favorite style icons (don’t judge me), John Mayer recently launched a Jewelry collection with unisex accessories maker George Frost. Now, anyone can just go and throw some beads on a necklace and call it a day, but each of the pieces in this collection actually have something cool hidden in the design.

For example, his two wooden and glass African bead necklaces actually contain a morse code message using the different colored beads as letters. One spells out “LOVE IS A VERB” and another “BORN AND RAISED”. His silver pendant, when spun, also spells out “LOVE IS A VERB”. His beaded bracelets once again uses morse code to spell out “BORN”, “RAISED” and his initials “JM”. Finally, he has a woven bracelet which uses a piece of 3M reflective thread mixed in with waxed linen.

Each piece is moderately priced for what this type of jewelry is typically going for, between $50 and $150 and I’m not sure if it’s required that you be a fan of John’s music to actually wear this stuff. At the very least, it could serve as some cool inspiration to make your own jewelry using morse code, which in all honesty, I think I might want to try.

2016 Johnny Onion Ride


Summer is making way for Autumn. That means it’s once again time for the darling of BLRC runs. The Buffalo Lazy Randonneur Club hosts our sixth annual and the world’s only Johnny Onion Ride. On this day we pay homage to AR JOHNNIGED BRO ROSKO, the pedaling peddlers of Breton’s famous Roscoff onions. Under their adopted moniker of Onion Johnny, these intrepid farmers have peddled their onions throughout Great Britain on bicycles. After crossing the channel by ferry, the Onion Johnny strings his bicycle with a hundred pounds of prized onions to sell to homes and restaurants. We will not ask so much of you.

We do ask that you outfit yourself in [stereo]typical french maritime or farmer style. Stripes, Berets, Neckerchiefs, etc. Also string a few onions to your own bike and we will add them to a cauldron of french onion soup made at the end of the ride. We gather at noon on the first Sunday of autumn at our waterfront park, a port of Buffalo’s own ferry. From there we lazily ride along bike paths to the rose garden pergola at Delaware Park, our nod to the English rose. Feel free to bring any other refreshments or picnic fare you like.

As always we request that you remain responsible for your own safety and equipment. Whenever you ride, follow all laws and safety precautions.

This is a RAIN OR SHINE event. Sailors and farmers dress like they do for a reason.

Johnny Onion Ride
Canalside Buffalo
Sunday, September 25th at Noon (Ride usually starts at 1-ish)


Manready Merc Knickerbocker MFG Chore Coat | J.Crew St. James T-shirt | Pedrito Beret | Dr. Collectors Rolling Scarf | Gant Slim Cargo Pants | Vintage Vixa Type 2 Chrono | New England Outerwear Co Lazy Mocs | Kronebourg Beer



One of my favorite watch blogs Worn & Wound recently reviewed a new watch from Swedish brand Nezumi Studios dubbed “The Voiture”. Inspired by the chronographs from the 60’s and 70’s racing era, the First Edition Voiture is powered by a mechanical-quartz movement made by Seiko. Worn & Wound’s in-depth review is exceptional and the photos he took are equally so. Head over to their site for a full rundown of this timepiece which is currently available for preorder in three different color ways. Consider this watch very high on my wish list.



Hello there, I have a question about the early Edwardian ties, around 1900. I can see some men on the photos wearing scarf ties, but i cannot find them anywhere to buy (unless they are just silk square scarves, tied in that way). Also, is it possible to wear an ascot outside the collar during the day, just plain tie without ruche or any other knot? I have seen some examples of the same way of tying an ascot as inside the shirt, but outside tucked into a waistcoat. And last one, also Edwardian neckties. Is there any difference between a necktie and tie ?

Kind regards,


Thanks so much for writing, Daniel. The only “Edwardian Ties” I’ve ever come across are usually found on sites like GentlemansEmporium.com. These ties are generally for the highest of formal wear occasions and are very Dandy in deed. But you will most likely have a hard time finding them in a brick in mortar store which is why I would recommend just going with a plain ascot which always has the perfect blend of casual yet dressy. You will also most likely have a difficult time finding ascots sold in stores these days, yet plenty of online shops offer them like Sterling Ascots and Ceravelo.


As for your other inquiry, if you take a look at the photos below, it’s entirely possibly to wear an ascot on the outside of the collar for a more casual look, but if that’s truly the look you are going for I would almost recommend just wearing a silk scarf like the one seen on Johnny Depp. Back in the day I used to wear an ascot from time to time and I loved how it looked. I didn’t even have a proper ascot, I just used a thin cotton scarf that I had and it looked great (at least I thought so).  What was great about it is it didn’t have the ruching on the back so if I wanted to wear it like a scarf, I still could. You can find plenty of silk scarf options online, which will lay the best, at stores like Nordstrom. Once you find what you are looking for, head on over to our “How To Tie an Ascot” tutorial.

I hope this helps Daniel. Thanks again for the question. Be sure to keep reading and as always, stay Dandy.



One of my favorite #menswear blogs Parisian Gentleman recently published an article reinforcing a firm belief of mine that one should be well-dressed while traveling on a plane. Not to say you need to be in a three-piece suit while taking your family on a trip to Disney World, but at the very least make an effort and don’t travel in pajama pants.

As Hugo points out,“Being elegantly dressed triggers a set of reactions with people you meet during your voyage – from ground agents, to the security team, to the border police, the cabin crew and the passengers, with these encounters accompanied by reactions which are consistently the same – smiles, kindness, respect and politeness — to the degree which camouflage cargo shorts with hiking sandals could never hope to replicate.”

[via Parisian Gentleman]


Traveling has been part of the DNA of Parisian Gentleman since we began this project seven years ago.

Sonya, Greg and I have been roaming the world tirelessly for the needs of our editorial work as well as for a number of side activities related to Parisian Gentleman – ranging from university conferences to private receptions, various “sartorial” events, PG events, and book signings, to visiting a staggering amount of workshops and manufactures for my books (as well as attending international trade salons, movie sets, interviews for the press—traditional and digital). As a matter of reality, we’ve been on the road more days then we can count.

Last year, for the research work for my upcoming “The Italian Gentleman” book and for the various signing events for “The Parisian Gentleman”, we traveled for a solid 9 months without setting foot back home. We trekked all over Italy of course, but also we spent significant time in Spain, the UK, the US, Asia, South America, Canada, and in Eastern Europe.

Of course, “on the road” is a figure of speech here. We mostly took the plane. And by mostly, I mean an obscene amount of time over the past twelve months.

Yet we never compromised with one of our internal rules – that of always traveling well-dressed. Be it with a full suit or sports jacket, a tie, a pocket square, or at the very least, a pair of well-shined shoes and a nice, freshly ironed shirt. This rule we wouldn’t cheat on, no matter the destination or the duration of the trip.


It’s a rule which might seem ludicrous to many – as it seems understood that the priority when traveling, in particular on a long-haul flight, would be to put comfort over style, for obvious reasons and benefits.

Still, having traveled a solid couple hundred times fully suited-up (with tie) over the past couple of years – and not only in business class (not by a long stretch) – I can attest that it is perfectly possible to travel while dressed elegantly. Not only that, but chances are, traveling in style will improve, almost constantly, the quality of your travel experience.

And why ? Being elegantly dressed triggers a set of reactions with people you meet during your voyage – from ground agents, to the security team, to the border police, the cabin crew and the passengers, with these encounters accompanied by reactions which are consistently the same – smiles, kindness, respect and politeness — to the degree which camouflage cargo shorts with hiking sandals could never hope to replicate.

Mad Men Flight

Believe me when I say : being dressed, and behaving elegantly for a long trip will almost always bring its fair share of perks and good surprises : last-minute upgrades for your seat arrangements, fast-pass for the check-in line, ease of access to many frequent flyer salons, and fast-tracks even without the right ticket, second servings of red wine and crackers, and a wealth of other similar tidbits that will make your trip more enjoyable. Dressing well, especially when sharp clothes are paired with elegant behavior, will earn you a lot of sympathy – especially when you act well in the gravity of a difficult situation without irritation or annoyance, and keep that smile alive.

Climbing in a place for a long-haul travel in a bespoke suit with a well-tied tie and a nice pair of shoes is a surprisingly positive experience – both for your own benefit and that of the crew, who seems to appreciate nicely dressed and well-behaved passengers. More often than not, the cabin crew will be particularly considerate to “that guy with the suit and the long hair” and his partner “that girl in the suit with a tie and suspenders, in seats 14 E and F”. Over the years, some crew members even approached us to say how nice it was for them to serve passengers that set themselves apart from the usual fare, in a positive way.

I like to travel while wearing a tie, if only to set myself apart from the crowd.

Another reason I prefer to wear a tie during travel is because this small gesture lends an “ambiance from the past” to the travel experience — as if crossing the Atlantic in an airplane was still an event in itself, a special occasion worth dressing well for in advance.

If you’re wearing a shirt from a quality source and if your tie is light and the knot is sturdy, you’ll be able to travel an entire eight-hours-plus trip without looking worse for wear, although you may need to loosen the tie a bit and open up your shirt collar a button or two for a nap…


Of course these days, traveling well-dressed does not necessarily require wearing a tie. Indeed, a nice travel jacket with a well-fitted button-down shirt and a good pair of cotton trousers will do the trick as well.

Traveling elegantly dressed is important, as far as I’m concerned — if only because it turns a deeply boring and frankly tiring experience in a truly pleasant human experience.

Try it for yourself, and see the difference…